How to Freeze Blueberries: Freezing Blueberries 101

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If you wondering how to freeze blueberries, you’ve come to the right place.

Not only do frozen blueberries act as awesome ingredients for smoothies, crumbles, and other desserts, but you can also eat frozen blueberries as snacks or make ice cream from them!

Searching for the best way to freeze blueberries?

There are a few different options which we’ll go into below based on how you want to use them, but just know that freezing fresh blueberries is super quick and will make those blueberries last for up to a year – money and time saved later on.

frozen and unfrozen blueberries
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Can You Freeze Blueberries?

A lot of people ask me, “can I freeze blueberries?” or “can blueberries be frozen” and the answer is 100% yes.

Not everything can be frozen, but most fruits can and blueberries definitely can be frozen.

frozen blueberries
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How to Freeze Fresh blueberries

There are two main ways to freeze fresh blueberries, depending on how you want to use them.

The first is freezing blueberries in ziploc bags or other containers (I love these ones) by using a “free flow” pack method.

This is also the answer to how to freeze blueberries without getting mushy.

In order to do this, first you want to get out a baking tray and put on some parchment paper.

Lay the fresh blueberries out flat, not touching, and then freeze for 2 hours or until frozen solid.

Then, pack the frozen blueberries into a ziploc bag or small container with a lid.

They won’t freeze together because they’re already frozen, so you will end up with individually frozen blueberries and not a solid chunk of them.

frozen blueberries in ziploc bag
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This is the way to go if you’re planning on eating them frozen or using them to make these blueberry overnight oats.

The other method is to do a dry sugar pack, which works well for soft or juicy fruit.

The juice that flows from the fruit combines with the sugar to make a natural syrup and allows it to freeze nicely.

To do this, place the blueberries in a bowl and sprinkle over the sugar.

Allow to set for a few minutes until the sugar dissolves.

This should take about 1 pound of sugar to every 4 pounds of fruit.

Stir the fruit gently and pack in containers, allowing about a centimeter of room at the top.

You can also do this on a smaller scale by placing a few blueberries in a small container, sprinkling with sugar, adding more blueberries and more sugar and continuing like that until the container is filled.

Upon thawing, you’ll end up with more of a blueberry syrup and large block of blueberries rather than individually frozen ones.

This can work great for tarts, pies, and other desserts where having the individually frozen blueberries isn’t necessary.

Do You Wash Blueberries Before Freezing?

I do always wash my blueberries before freezing, ensuring that I use a colander and some water and then let them dry on paper towels.

I want to make sure that there are no extra unwanted guests or sprays on my fruit before freezing so that once I thaw it out, I can enjoy without worries.

blueberries ready to freeze on baking tray
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How Long Do Frozen Blueberries Last?

If you’re wondering how long you can freeze blueberries for and how long blueberries last in the freezer, the answer is up to about a year.

That’s a long time to be able to use these delicious fruits!

Freezing Blueberries

frozen blueberries

Learn how to freeze blueberries to enjoy frozen blueberries in tarts, pies, or smoothies or to eat them frozen!

Prep Time 10 minutes
Additional Time 2 hours
Total Time 2 hours 10 minutes

Ingredients

  • Blueberries
  • Granulated sugar (for dry pack method)

Instructions

    There are two main ways to freeze fresh blueberries, depending on how you want to use them.

    The first is freezing blueberries in ziplock bags or other containers by using a "free flow" pack method. This is also the answer to how to freeze blueberries without getting mushy.

    In order to do this, first you want to get out a baking tray and put on some parchment paper.

    Lay the fresh blueberries out flat, not touching, and then freeze for 2 hours or until frozen solid.

    Then, pack the frozen blueberries into a ziplock bag or small container with a lid. They won't freeze together because they're already frozen, so you will end up with individually frozen blueberries and not a solid chunk of them. This is the way to go if you're planning on eating them frozen.

    The other method is to do a dry sugar pack, which works well for soft or juicy fruit. The juice that flows from the fruit combines with the sugar to make a natural syrup and allows it to freeze nicely.

    To do this, place the blueberries in a bowl and sprinkle over the sugar.

    Allow to set for a few minutes until the sugar dissolves. This should take about 1 pound of sugar to every 4 pounds of fruit.

    Stir the fruit gently and pack in containers, allowing about a centimeter of room at the top.

    You can also do this on a smaller scale by placing a few blueberries in a small container, sprinkling with sugar, adding more blueberries and more sugar and continuing like that until the container is filled.

    Upon thawing, you'll end up with more of a blueberry syrup and large block of blueberries rather than individually frozen ones. This can work great for tarts, pies, and other desserts where having the individually frozen blueberries isn't necessary.

Recommended Products

As an Amazon Associate and member of other affiliate programs, I earn from qualifying purchases.

How to Freeze Blueberries: Freezing Blueberries 101 via @nofusskitchen
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